Fire Slows – Fish Fire at 2,050 Acres

fish_fire_from_helicopter

Source: http://inciweb.org/incident/article/3701/21012/

Incident: Fish Fire Wildfire
Released: 3 hrs. ago

Acres: 2,050
Reported Date: August 23, 2013 at 1:00 p.m.
Cause: Lightning
Location: 25 miles northeast of Springville, CA
Containment: 25 percent
Fuels: Mixed conifer with brush understory
Terrain: Steep, rugged
Resources: 6 helicopters, 6 hotshot crews, 3 hand crews
Total Personnel: 399

SPRINGVILLE, CA – Containment on the Fish Fire increased to 25 percent as a result of several days of hard work by fire crews. The fire grew 50 acres yesterday to 2,050 acres; fire behavior remains moderate, primarily a surface fire, because of higher humidity and increased fuel moisture content.

Tomorrow crews will continue suppression efforts on two of the three large slop overs located between the eastern flank of the fire and the Kern River. The third slop over will be monitored from the air because of inaccessibility and safety concerns. Crews will also continue fire line construction on the west side of the fire to the Great Western Divide near Angora Mountain.

An additional helicopter arrived on the fire yesterday and as a safety precaution, a second Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) was put in place over the incident command post.

In an effort to provide for public safety, a closure has been put into place for the fire area in the Golden Trout Wilderness. More information on the area closure can be found at http://tinyurl.com/jwwlglr.

Although smoke produced by the fire has decreased, smoke may be visible from the surrounding communities throughout the day and is likely to settle into the valleys overnight and in the morning hours. Information on air quality and measures you can take at home to reduce your exposure to smoke can be found on http://www.valleyair.org/Home.htm for the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District or http://www.gbuapcd.org/ for the Great Basin Unified Air Pollution Control District.

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